Standards & P...

Standards & Procedures

What You Need To Know About Your Child’s Exams and Assessments September 2016

In recent years, the Ministère de  l’Éducation et de l’Enseignement Supérieur (MEES) has put the emphasis on formal evaluations in the form of end of year exams.  Every school in the province must have a School Success Plan, with the priority of individual student achievement.  The exam results provide schools with data that allows us to look at how our students are performing in the three core subjects of English Language Arts (ELA), Math and French Second Language (FSL), and it gives teachers the opportunity to reflect on their teaching practices.  As well, Western Quebec School Board administers tests and exams throughout the year to act as benchmarks for data collection so that student achievement can be tracked across the board and to help teachers support students in their learning.

The following chart details the different tests and exams:

Grade level Test/Exam Date of testing Weighting
Kindergarten BAS- Benchmark Assessment System (letter, word recognition, book sense) May evidence towards term results
Grade 1 BAS (Benchmark Assessment System)- English reading assessment October + May evidence towards term results
Grade 2 Math exam May 30- June 15 10% of the year
BAS October + May evidence towards term results
Grade 3 Math exam May 30- June 15 15% of the year
French exam May-June 15% of the year
BAS October +May evidence towards term results
Grade 4 Math exam May 30- June 15 15% of the year
English exam Jan 23-Feb 3 evidence towards term results
BAS October  + May evidence towards term results
Grade 5 Math exam May 30- June 15 20% of the year
French exam May-June 20% of the year
BAS October + May evidence towards term results
Grade 6 Math exam (MEESR Épreuve) June 12- June 16 20% of the year
English exam (MEESR Épreuve) May 8- May 19 20% of the year
French exam  (WQSB exam) May-June 20% of the year
BAS October + May evidence towards term results

 

The English and French exams/epreuves are process exams; that is, there is an overall theme for the exam and the students work on it over a period of several weeks.  These are higher-level thinking exams, requiring students to pull together much of the knowledge they have accumulated over the school year as opposed to an exam that has them recalling information. The math exam reflects two competencies: uses mathematical reasoning and solves a situational problem. For math reasoning students will solve mastery questions (mental math, multiple choice, short answer) and application situations. The situational problem is a compilation of the different math concepts they have learned over the year in one longer problem.

The math exam reflects the two competencies; students work on shorter application problems that emphasize a different math skill set, whereas the situational problem is another compilation of the different math concepts they have learned over the year in one longer problem.  Except for the Ministry (MEES) epreuves, all exams are developed by teachers and consultants at the board level or shared amongst school boards.

All of this data is used to make many school- based decisions:  programming, providing resource support for struggling students, identifying student profiles, determining groupings of students.  Also, it supports decisions for individual students:  different programming options, placement at the end of the school year, further testing for special education supports, etc.

As parents, it is important for you to prepare your child for exams by ensuring that they have a good night’s sleep, eat well, spend some time reviewing the material in advance, and arrive to school on time and attend every day throughout the exam period.

Should you have any questions or concerns, please contact your child’s teacher or the principal for further information.

Marie-Eve Groulx

Principal